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Kathryn Lilley, members of the Cambridge Centre for Proteomics and collaborators publish a human cell atlas in Science

last modified Jul 25, 2017 09:24 AM
Kathryn Lilley and members of the Cambridge Centre for Proteomics, with collaborators from the Royal Institute of Technology, KTH, Sweden publish a human cell atlas in Science, 11th May 2017.

A subcellular map of the human proteome

 

Lilley

Kathryn Lilley and members of the Cambridge Centre for Proteomics, with collaborators from the Royal Institute of Technology, KTH, Sweden publish a human cell atlas in Science, 11th May 2017.

They present a comprehensive image-based map of the subcellular protein distribution, the Cell Atlas, built by integrating transcriptomics and antibody-based immunofluorescence microscopy with validation by mass spectrometry. Mapping the in situ localization of 12,003 human proteins at a single-cell level to 30 subcellular structures enabled the definition of 13 major organelle proteomes. Exploration of the proteomes reveals single-cell variations of abundance or spatial distribution, and localization of approximately half of the proteins to multiple compartments. This subcellular map can be used to refine existing protein-protein interaction networks and provides an important resource to deconvolute the highly complex architecture of the human cell.

More information can be found here.

The full publication can be read here.

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